Business Letters

There are a number of types of business letters in English. Accomplished speakers of English also need to be able to write the following types of business letters to be successful In business. Begin with a clear understanding of business letter writing basics. Once you’ve understood basic layout styles, standard phrases, salutation and endings, continue to improve your business letter writing skills by learning to write the following types of business letters. Making An Inquiry Make an Inquiry when you are requesting more Information about a product or service.

This type of business letter tends to include specific information such as roduct type, as well as asking for further details in the form of brochures, catalogs, telephone contact, etc. Making inquiries can also help you keep up on your competition! Sales Letters Sales Letters are used to introduce new products to new customers and past clients. It’s important to outline an important problem that needs to be solved and provide the solution in sales letters. This example letter provides an outline, as well as important phrases to use when sending out a wide variety of sales letters.

Replying to an Inquiry Replying to inquiries are one of the most important business letters that you write. Customers who make inquiries are interested in specific information, and are excellent business prospects. Learn how to thank the customers, provide as much information as possible, as well as make a call to action for a positive outcome. Account Terms and Condltlons When a new customer opens an account it is essential to inform them of account terms and conditions. If you run a small business, it is common to provide these terms and conditions in the form of a letter.

This guide provides a clear example on which you can base your own business letters providing account terms and conditions. Letters of Acknowledgment For legal purposes letters of acknowledgment are often requested. These letters are also referred to as letters of receipt and tend to be rather formal and short. These can be easily adapted for a number of purposes. Placing an Order As a business person, you will often place an order – especially if you have a large supply chain for your product. This example business letter provides an outline to make sure your order placement is clear so that you receive exactly what you order.

Making a Claim Unfortunately, from time to time it is necessary to make a claim against nsatisfactory work. This example business letter provides a strong example of a claim letter and includes important phrases to express your dissatisfaction and future expectations when making a claim. Adjusting a Claim Even the best business may make a mistake from time to time. In this case, you may be called upon to adjust a claim. This type of business letter provides an example to send to unsatisfied customers making sure that you address their specific concerns, as well as retain them as future customers.

Cover Letters Cover letters are extremely important when applying for a new position. Cover letters should include a short introduction, highlight the most important information in your resume and elicit a positive response from your prospective employer. These two examples of cover letters are part of a larger section on the site providing all the information you will need on taking an interview in English during your Job search. Proper Business Letter Formats Business letters in the United States, use four common letter formats. Variations differ for other countries such as the date is composed in another style.

All proper business letter formats are acceptable but the block is more common. Block Letter Format: The common block letter format is formatted with all of your text flush with the left margin. Paragraphs are doubled spaced and all line text single spaced. The margins are a standard word processor setting of one inch. (see the image of Block Letter Format). 1. Return Address: If your stationery has a letterhead, skip this. Otherwise, type your name, address and optionally, phone number. These days, it’s common to also include an email address. 2. Date: Type the date of your letter two to six lines below the letterhead.

Three are standard. If there is no letterhead, type it where shown. . Reference Line: If the recipient specifically requests information, such as a Job reference or invoice number, type it on one or two lines, immediately below the Date (2). If you’re replying to a letter, refer to it here. For example, Re: job # 625-01 Re: Your letter dated 1/1 /200x. 4. Special Mailing Notations: Type in all uppercase characters, if appropriate. Examples include SPECIAL DELIVERY CERTIFIED MAIL AIRMAIL 5. On-Arrival Notations: Type in all uppercase characters, if appropriate.

You might want to include a notation on private correspondence, such as a resignation letter. Include the same on the envelope. Examples are PERSONAL CONFIDENTIAL 6. Inside Address: Type the name and address of the person and/or company to whom you’re sending the letter, three to eight lines below the last component you typed. Four lines are standard. If you type an Attention Line (7), skip the person’s name here. Do the same on the envelope. 7. Attention Line: Type the name of the person to whom you’re sending the letter. If you type the person’s name in the Inside Address (6), skip this.

Do the same on theenvelope. 8. Salutation: Type the recipient’s name here. Type Mr. or Ms. [Last Name] to show espect, but don’t guess spelling or gender. Some common salutations are Ladies: Gentlemen: Dear Sir: Dear Sir or Madam: Dear [Full Name]: To Whom it May Concern: left or centered. Be concise on one line. If you type a Reference Line (3), consider if you really need this line. While it’s not really necessary for most employment-related letters, examples are below. SUBJECT: RESIGNATION LETTER OF REFERENCE JOB INQUIRY 10. Body: Type two spaces between sentences.

Keep it brief and to the point. 1 1 . Complimentary Close: What you type here depends on the tone and degree of ormality. For example, Respectfully yours (very formal) Sincerely (typical, less formal) Very truly yours (polite, neutral) Cordially yours (friendly, informal) 12. Signature Block: Leave four blank lines after the Complimentary Close (11) to sign your name. Sign your name exactly as you type it below your signature. Title is optional depending on relevancy and degree of formality. Examples are John Doe, Manager P. Smith Director, Technical Support R. T. Jones – Sr. Field Engineer 13.

Identification Initials: If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically nclude three of your initials in all uppercase characters, then two of his or hers in all lowercase characters. If you typed your own letter, Just skip it since your name is already in the Signature Block (12). Common styles are below. JAD/cm JAD:cm clm 14. Enclosure Notation: This line tells the reader to look in the envelope for more. Type the singular for only one enclosure, plural for more. If you don’t enclose anything, skip it. Common styles are below. Enclosure Enclosures: 3 Enclosures (3) 15. c: Stands for courtesy copies (formerly carbon copies). List the names of people he recipient of the letter, include them. If you don’t copy your letter to anyone, skip it. Tips: Replace the text in brackets [ ] with the component indicated. Don’t type the brackets. Try to keep your letters to one page, but see page 2 of this sample if you need continuation pages. How many blank lines you add between lines that require more than one, depends on how much space is available on the page. The same goes for margins. One and one-half inch (108 points) for short letters and one inch (72 points) for longer letters are standard.

If there is a letterhead, its osition determines the top margin on page 1 . If you don’t type one of the more formal components, dont leave space for them. For example, if you don’t type the Reference Line (3), Special Mailing Notations (4) andOn-Arrival Notations (5), type the Inside Address (6) four lines below the Date Semi-block Letter Format: For the semi-block, the only difference between the semi and alternative block is as opposed to have the body text Justified left, the first line of each paragraph is indented. Legend: 1 . Return Address: If your stationery has a letterhead, skip this.

Otherwise, type your ame, address and optionally, phone number, five spaces to the right of center or flush with the right margin. Five spaces to the right of center is common. These days, it’s also common to include an email address. 2. Date: Type the date five spaces to the right of center or flush with the right margin, two to six lines below the letterhead. Five spaces to the right of center and three lines reference or invoice number, type it on one or two lines, immediately below and aligned with the Date (2). If you’re replying to a letter, refer to it here. For example, Re: Your letter dated 1/1/200x. 9.

Subject Line: Type the gist of your letter in all uppercase characters. Be concise on one line. If you type a Reference Line (3), consider if you really need this line. While it’s not really necessary for most employment-related letters, examples are below. JOB INQUIRY between sentences. Keep it brief and to the point. 1 1 . Complimentary Close: Type this aligned with the Date (2). What you type here depends on the tone and degree of formality. For example, 12. Signature Block: Align this block with the Complimentary Close (11). Leave four blank lines to sign your name. Sign it exactly the same as you typed it below your ignature.

Title is optional depending on relevancy and degree of formality. Examples are to whom you distribute copies, in alphabetical order. If addresses would be useful to tips: Alternative Block Letter Format: The alternative block letter format moves the return address, date, closing, name, title and signature to the left side of the page. Simplified Letter Format: This format takes the same properties of the block letter with one exception, the greeting or salutation is eliminated. This is a helpful format when you don’t know the recipient’s gender is male or female, or Mrs. or Miss. Modified block letter 1.

Heading: Type the recipient’s name, page number, and Date and Reference Line frompage 1. Type the heading across the page as shown, or type it flush with the left margin as in a full block letter. If you don’t know the recipient’s name, type the same thing as you did in the Inside Address on page 1; e. g. , the company name. 2. Body: Type two spaces between sentences. Keep it brief and to the point. 3. Complimentary Close: Type this five spaces to the right of center as shown on page 1, or right Justify it with the date if you typed the Heading (1) across the page, as shown above.

What you type here depends on the tone and degree of formality. For example, Respectfully yours (very formal) 4. Signature Block: Leave four blank lines after the Complimentary Close (3) to sign 5. Identification Initials: If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically lowercase characters. If you typed it, Just skip it since your name is already in theSignature Block (4). Common styles are below. 6. Enclosure Notation: This line tells the reader to look in the envelope for more documents. Type the singular for only one enclosure, plural for more. If you don’t enclose anything, skip it.

Common styles are below. Enclosure 7. cc: Stands for courtesy copies (formerly carbon copies). List the names of people to whom you distribute copies, in alphabetical order. If addresses would be useful to Use letterhead only for the first page. Just use a blank sheet of paper for Examples are: o Appreciation Letter – a letter of gratitude and appreciation for help extended, or a good business deal. o Thank you – is a letter of gratitude. o Congratulations – is a letter that praises the recipient for a Job well- done o Letter of Recognition – a written statement of recognized efforts similar to an appreciation letter.

Letter of Reference – is a character reference letter. It is a letter building up the character ofa person to be accepted in a Job. o Recommendation – is an endorsement letter to hire a certain person. Sympathy letter – is a letter of condolences toa person or family. o Invitation letter – is a letter persuading a person or a company to Join an event or an occasion. o Letter of credit – is a way of endorsing a certain business to be considered a credit loan. o Letter of interest – a reply to an invitation that confirms presence on the event/occasion. o Business memorandum – notices that are distributed to the staff.

They are reminders of company activities, or imminent changes in the company. Business introduction – is done to introduce a new business to the readers. o Business letter – a letter that talks about the plans for the business. o Donation letter – a letter asking for donations. o Termination letter – more popularly known as a resignation letter. It signifies someone’s desire to leave a Job permanently. Business-to-Client letters are: o Welcome Letter – welcomes the client and thanking him for choosing the company. o Letter of Appreciation – thanks the client for having business with the company. o

Apology Letter – asking the client for reconsideration, and apologizes for failing to deliver. o Collection Letter – notice outstanding payments due. o Invoice Letter Template – this is asking the clients to state the invoice number of their transactions. o Letter of Invitation – inviting a client to Join a certain gathering. o Marketing Letter – is stating the newest products that the company will provide soon or is presently providing. o Rejection Letter – is stating the rejection of the client’s request. Business readers expect to receive letters and memos that adhere to an existing format standard.