The Importance of Music Industry Analysts

Bell Intro to Show Production Systems October 7, 2013 The Importance of Music Industry Analysts in a Technically Evolving World..? Why is it important to care about how performances are presented in the Music Industry? Or how culture is transformed through media repetition? These are concerns that you’ll commonly find music analysts and critics writing about in internet blobs and newspaper editorials.

Mostly bias opinions about artists and references are discussed, including individual songs or pieces or entire albums. Author of the email newsletter and blob the ‘Leaflets Letter’, bib Leaflets has been engaged In American music culture as a critic and analyst for over 25 years. Bob Leaflets worked as an entertainment business attorney and also was head of Sanctuary Music’s American division. As the reviewer who judged many songs and pieces, Leaflet’s writing brings more to the table than one may think an Insider and critic In the Industry should.

The themes explored in his writings challenge the audience to engage with popular in a critical way. How valuable are analysts who don’t get you to think critically about culture? Bob Leaflet’s editorials include personal reflections on songs, artist and live performances. With an autonomous and unique perspective of the Music Industry, Bob Leaflets navigates his readers through gritty personal observances and clever written language. Interestingly, when describing artist and events, Bob Leaflet’s carefully unfolds the setting with descriptive personal accounts and cynical rhetoric.

His attitude about the state of the USIA Industry frequents his letters where topics discussed range from the degradation of talent, to the need for real value In today’s performing artist. In a recent letter editorial, Bob Leaflets explored the rambunctious Mille Cyrus ‘towering’ Controversy. In his Letter published August 08, 2013, Leaflets briefly discusses the how the lack of value in performances riddled In ‘media repetition’ continues to corrode an already ‘culturally bankrupt society’. “It’s a performance. With no socially redeeming values. It’s meaningless.

Neither fish nor fowl. And if you’ve got your knickers in a twist about Mille Cyrus cavorting on stage at the Vamp you must live a cloistered little life and be afraid of your shadow. ” Here, he cleverly describes how unimportant the performance was on stage, and how much of a tool In the case of Mille Cyrus’, her performance at Mat’s Vamp raised the question about how the youth may engage TV and Media as aspiring talents in the future. Bob Leaflets mentions some hearty advice for those who look to participate In today’s music Industry, “Truly want to change the world?

Then move right along, pay no attention, especially in this Internet age where whatever transpired will evaporate 1 OFF stop paying attention to these no-talents there will be a better chance of true talents emerging. ” I believe it comes back to the fundamental way that cultural societies are engineered, it’s vital to have analyst that focus primarily on the validity of the popular culture of the time, so that we as the audience can make the decision of whether or not we choose to accept cultural farce or see the value it has in society.

It is especially important to even be aware of how the world is developing in a technical sense, in a way that affects popular culture in gains or loss of true value. If there is a degradation of value in the music industry projected through media, then how can the audience, fans, and musicians hope to aspire talent with real value in an ever- changing industry? Or even an ever-changing world? Bob Leaflets not only challenges his readers to be be aware of the merit or lack of merit in the music industry, but he also manages to indirectly teach how irrevocably important to critically think about our own lives.